Senior Seminar Reflection

24 January 2019

Reflection 1

Last semester I took my senior seminar class. I’m a history major, so before my junior year ended, I was already researching and developing my topic. With the guidance and encouragement from Professor Kennedy, I decided my topic would be on Stalin, specifically how western political cartoons depicted him from 1939, the year of the Nazi- Soviet Pack, to his death in 1953. My favorite part of my senior seminar was to finding sources for my topic, which I did during summer break. I went from bookstore to bookstore and even to antique shops and searched for old collections of political cartoons.

When class started, that was when my difficulties emerged. For some reason I could not relate to any of the other students. I felt isolated and alone. I felt alienated and all alone. Everyone was very nice, but interacting was challenging and sometimes downright impossible for me. I do not know why I felt like that. I just remember crying a lot.

I did let that stop me from being happy in my senior seminar class, however, I refuse to let that stop me in the future. I can use that experience to overcome any similar obstacles in the future. I will not always be able to relate to everyone, and that is fine. I just can not let that stop me anymore. I want to be happy, so I will fight for it.

In my Summit and History learning outcomes, I link back to this reflection a couple of times.

For the History Major Learning Outcomes, I reference this reflection for these outcomes:

1. Seek, find, evaluate and utilize primary sources and secondary historical literature; develop and articulate persuasive arguments based in historical evidence both orally and in written work

2. Develop and articulate persuasive arguments based in historical evidence both orally and in written work

3. Apply knowledge and critical interpretation of the past to an understanding of crucial aspects of one’s own cultural and historical background as well as the backgrounds of others

4. Describe and analyze current developments within historical contexts

5. Apply the results of research, writing and speaking experiences within the major, along with experiential learning and career investigation opportunities (internships, externships, seminars or workshops conducted by history faculty and alumnae) to career planning and graduate school and job applications.

For the Summit Learning Outcomes, I reference this reflection for these outcomes:

4. Communicate effectively through writing and speaking, especially across cultural or linguistic differences

6. Articulate and appraise problems and solutions from multiple perspectives, critically considering diverse sources of information

7. Recognize, analyze, and employ effective teamwork

10. Interpret quantitative information or demonstrate the methods of inquiry appropriate for investigating the natural world

11. Analyze human behavior or social relations

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